Hafsa S. Mansoor

Associate, New York

Biography

Overview

Hafsa is a litigation associate in White & Case's New York office. She maintains an active pro bono practice focused on actualizing civil and human rights and advancing criminal justice reform, including representing a class of impoverished debtors suing the City of Ferguson, Missouri for its wealth-based detention practices.

Hafsa graduated as valedictorian of her law school class. She served as a Center for Social Justice Scholar and also as a Postgraduate Fellow for Detained Immigrant Defense at the Seton Hall Law Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic, where she represented detained immigrants in removal proceedings and co-authored a report on the impact of immigration bond practices on the surge of COVID-19 infections in ICE detention facilities. Hafsa also served as Senior Articles Editor of the Seton Hall Law Review and has written two published law review articles, Guilty Until Proven Guilty: Effective Bail Reform as a Human Rights Imperative and Modern Racism but Old-Fashioned IIEDs: How Incongruous Injury Standards Deny "Thick Skin" Plaintiffs Redress for Racism and Ethnoviolence. Additionally, during law school, Hafsa interned for Judge Esther Salas, D.N.J., and co-founded FirstGenJD, an online resource guide for first generation law students.

Hafsa will be clerking in the Southern District of New York in 2023.

Bars and Courts
New York State Bar
New Jersey State Bar
Education
JD
Seton Hall University School of Law
International Human Rights & Political Science
Webster University
Languages
English
Urdu

Experience

Publications

Guilty Until Proven Guilty: Effective Bail Reform as a Human Rights Imperative, DePaul Law Review (2021)

A Long Time Coming: How the Immigration Bond and Detention System Created Today's COVID-19 Tinderbox, Seton Hall University School of Law Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic (2020)

Modern Racism but Old-Fashioned IIEDs: How Incongruous Injury Standards Deny "Thick Skin" Plaintiffs Redress for Racism and Ethnoviolence, Seton Hall Law Review (2020)